Valhalla UberMod

Best for DISSOLVING INTO CHORUS FLANGING MULTITAP REVERB WEIRDNESS
$50

Stupendous and unheard-of splendors await me below, and I shall seek them soon.

ValhallaÜberMod is a unique mutltap delay and modulation plugin.

With up to 32 modulated delay taps, extensive diffusion and overdrive sections, and parallel slow and vibrato LFOs, ÜberMod creates lush dimensional choruses, classic string ensembles, tape and BBD echoes, nonlinear and reverse reverbs, and a bunch of sounds that defy categorization.

Now updated to version 1.1.6! VST3, signed & notarized installers for Mac (ready for Big Sur), signed installers for Windows.

$50

Plugin UI

 UI

Modes

2TapChorus

4TapEnsemble

SuperSix

6TapRandom

DualEnsemble

8Tap

16Phase

16Tap

32Tap

Two modulated delay taps, one for the left input signal, one for the right input signal. The slow tap modulation is derived from a single triangle LFO, with the modulation phase inverted for one of the taps (I call this “antiphase modulation”). The vibrato modulation uses a quadrature oscillator, with the left and right modulations separated by 90 degrees. The 2TapChorus mode is useful for emulating the Roland Dimension C and Dimension D choruses, and also serves as a useful starting point for tape echos, diffusion-based reverbs, and all sorts of other effects.

4TapEnsemble has 4 modulated delay taps, 2 for the left input channel, 2 for the right input channel. There are 2 slow LFOs, one for the left taps and one for the right taps, using the same antiphase modulation as the 2TapChorus, but with different rates for each channel. Each channel has a single sine vibrato oscillator modulating one of the taps, with different rates for each input/output channel. The 4TapEnsemble can be viewed as 2 mono versions of the 2TapChorus, one panned left, and one panned right. The architecture was derived from the ensemble section of the VP330, and is naturally suited towards creating string ensemble emulations, as well as thick detuned choruses.

SuperSix has 6 modulated delay taps (3 left/3 right). There are 3 slow triangle LFOs, using the antiphase modulation technique. Each channel has its own independent 3-phase vibrato LFO (0/120/240 degree outputs) for emulating the vibrato component of classic string ensembles. The vibrato speed is slightly different between left and right channels for a wider stereo spread. The SuperSix mode is a good starting point for emulating the “unison” control on older analog polyphonic synth; when all of the oscillators were used to create a massive detuned sound. SuperSix is also useful for creating triplet echos, short gated sounds, and other multitap effects.

6 modulated delay taps (3 left/3 right), and 3 slow LFOs, each of which has a randomized triangle waveform for the slow LFO. The left and right channels are modulated in antiphase, in a similar manner to the SuperSix mode, but the randomized triangle results in less audible patterns for the detuning. There are 6 independent vibrato LFOs, one for each output tap. The 6TapRandom mode is useful for thick multitap choruses, with less audible patterns than the SuperSix mode.

Stereo version of the classic string ensemble choruses, as found in the Solina/ARP String Ensemble, Crumar Performer, Moog Opus 3, Korg Polysix, and so on. Each channel has its own dedicated 3-phase slow LFO (0/120/240 degree outputs), with each of the 3taps per channel being modulated by its own phase. An identical LFO, running at a faster rate, is used for the vibrato modulation of the taps. The three-phase LFOs for left and right channels are running at slightly different rates, to create the impression of a separate string ensemble for left and right channels. The DualEnsemble mode is the first place to turn for emulating vintage ensembles but is also useful for creating unique effects that combine ensemble modulation with multitap effects and diffusion.

8 modulated delay taps (4 left/4 right). There are 4 slow triangle LFOs, using the antiphase modulation technique, with the frequencies arranged to produce a smooth detuned sound at “sensible” settings, or a cluster of pitches when OverMod is used. There are 8 sine vibrato LFOs, one per each tap, for thick ensemble sounds. The 8Tap mode is useful for creating realistic orchestral choruses, multitap effects, short gated reverbs, ensemble effects that don’t have the distinctive three-phase modulation patterns, crazy pitched echos (check out the presets in the Pitched folder, which all use the 8Tap mode) and all sorts of cool things.

16-tap mode (8 taps left/8 taps right) where all of the taps are modulated by two unique 16-phase sine LFOs, one for the slow modulation, and one for the vibrato. The phases are staggered left-right to get a wider spatial image. This is useful for creating a “super string ensemble” that has the distinctive lushness and artifacts of the old three-phase string ensembles, only more so. The 16Phase mode is also useful for denser gated and reverse reverbs, nonlinear echos, metallic comb filtering (with the DEPTH set to 0.0), and new and unexplored areas.

16-tap mode (8 taps left/8 taps right). There are 8 slow triangle LFOs, using the antiphase modulation technique, with the frequencies arranged to produce a smooth distribution of detuned outputs. The triangle LFO phases are inverted between channels to get a wide spatial image. There are 16 sine vibrato LFOs, one per each tap, with the frequencies staggered to simulate 16 separate sound sources. The 16Tap mode is useful for lush choruses that have less obvious “string ensemble” artifacts than the 16Phase mode, realistic modeling of large numbers of instruments, gated and reverse reverbs, and strong comb filters.

Double the taps (16 taps left/16 taps right) as the 16-tap mode. There are 16 slow triangle LFOs, using the antiphase modulation technique, with the frequencies arranged to produce a smooth distribution of detuned outputs. The triangle LFO phases are inverted between channels, to get a wide spatial image. There are 32 sine vibrato LFOs, one per each tap, with the frequencies staggered to simulate 16 separate sound sources. The main application of the 32Tap mode is for nonlinear, gated and reverse reverbs, where the high tap density can be used in conjunction with the DIFF controls to get dense reverbs without feedback. All sorts of crazy echos and pseudo-reverbs can be made with the 32Tap mode.

Try the Demo

OSX Demo: ValhallaUberModOSXDemo_1_1_6

Windows Demo: ValhallaUberModWinDemo_V1_1_6

The demo versions of ValhallaÜberMod are identical to the full versions, except that the delay fades out and back in every 45 seconds.

Overview

Hear it in action

See what people are saying

“Boundless modulation at a bargain price - don't miss this one, no matter what kind of music you make.”

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Gearslutz

“This review barely touches the sides of what you can do with UberMod”

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Audio Geek Zine

“I eventually gave up trying to control it completely and just let it do weird and wonderful things”

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Igneous Flame

“I’ve spent weeks experimenting with UberMod now and I’m still finding new combinations and possibilities – no ‘one trick pony’ here!”

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Specifications

Current Version: 1.1.6

Changes since 1.0.2:

  • VST3
  • Ready for Big Sur
  • Signed & notarized installers for Mac
  • Signed installers for Windows
  • 64-bit only (32/64-bit versions available in user accounts)

ValhallaDSP plugins are self documenting. Just roll over the controls to read the tool tip on the bottom left of the plugin.

For each plugin, I also write blog posts (see below) with product overviews, tips and tricks. Here are the blog posts for ValhallaÜberMod:

What is UberMod?

The History

The Name

Modes

WARP Parameters

DRIVE Parameters

EQ Parameters

DIFF Parameters

TAPS Parameters

MOD Parameters

High Level Controls

If you have questions, please head to Support.

Compatibility:

  • Windows: Windows 7/8/10
  • Plugin formats: 64-bit VST2.4/VST3/AAX

 

  • Mac: OSX 10.8/10.9/10.10/10.11, macOS 10.12/10.13/10.14/10.15, macOS 11 Big Sur
  • Plugin Formats: 64-bit VST2.4/VST3/AAX/AU